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Archive for the ‘coping with exams’ Category

Eat Smart to Boost Exam Performance

Thursday, May 25th, 2017

Did you know that food CAN improve exam performance? In fact, when you ‘eat smart,’ you can give your brain a massive dose of much-needed energy. Essential when you’re flat out revising and sitting exam papers…

Tasty tips to feed your brain

  1. Don’t skip meals… Breakfast has been proven to be the best meal of the day for teenagers sitting exams. Not only will you perform better, you won’t be struck with hunger pangs just at the moment when you’re trying to think of that quote or formula! Opt for energy-giving porridge and oat brekkies. Nosh on protein such as eggs and nuts to fill you up for longer.
  2. Drink like a fish. Water hydrates you, whereas sugary drinks eventually zap energy. If sipping water isn’t your thing, add sugar-free juice to water instead. It’s a much better option than fizzy colas or sodas as it helps keep you alert, keeps headaches at bay, and helps you perform for longer. Milk is fab too!
  3. Snacks to snaffle. Exams can drain your energy big time! Tempting as it is to raid the biscuit tin as soon as you get home, nibble on nuts instead! Fancy a fruity something? Opt for bananas and apples which slowly release energy into your bloodstream helping spread your energy out over the day.

And if you are a ‘stay-up-late-to-revise’ type, aim to get some shut-eye earlier than usual. A lack of sleep can affect your memory, as well as slow your thinking down. So get yourself tucked up in bed by 10pm!

Whether you’re in year 5, 10, 11 or 13, a healthy mind and body will boost your chances of passing those pesky entrance, GCSE or A Level exams first time round.

Call the tuition team

And don’t forget, when you need an extra helping hand, our team of tutors are on hand with support, motivation and learning techniques. Spanning the Manchester and Cheshire areas, there’s always someone here to help you through.

Four fab stress busters!

Monday, April 10th, 2017

Have you noticed your child showing signs of stress? Given that over half of schools across the UK recently reported an increase in kids feeling more anxious, stress is becoming a more common childhood experience than ever before.

With endless pressure to pass exams and achieve – on top of the usual hormone battles – the mix is a potentially damaging one.

Firstly, bad stress impacts on learning. Anxiety stops the brain from processing and retaining information. As a result, frustration can set in – leading to children feeling overwhelmed.

Of course, stress can be a motivator. It’s a natural part of life… That’s why it matters that we help children to feel more empowered by the challenges ahead, not daunted by them. Here’s four ways to do it.

Strategies to beat stress

  1. Set realistic goals: Rome wasn’t built in a day. When you help your child win the smaller challenges, it helps build their resilience to cope with the bigger ones. Achievable step-by-step targets across several months also break down the enormity of the final exam.
  2. Make mistakes: Making mistakes helps children learn. If your child writes a story or essay, or does a subject practice paper and the result isn’t what they expected, encourage them to think about the result differently. Rather than dwelling on negatives, get them to ask: what could I have done better? Or What worked well? Reflecting on what went wrong and right, encourages a more balanced response.
  3. Think positively: Negative self-talk is something we all need to deal with at times. But in children looking for acceptance and success in life, it’s even more important that we teach our children to feel good about having a go, to accept failure and then move on to the next challenge. Encourage your child to see that doing their best on the day is good enough.
  4. Pamper yourself: Exams are not everything in life. Help your child get what their body needs: sleep, nourishing food, relaxation, fresh air. Don’t pass on your deep worries about them passing or failing exams; just try to encourage them instead. This will help them relax during downtime rather than dwell on problems.

Top local tuition to fix learning problems

Whether you live in the Manchester area, or across Cheshire, it can make a difference to seek out support with an experienced tutor. Our 121 Home Tutors team can be reached by getting in touch today.

Exam failure isn’t the end of the world

Tuesday, December 27th, 2016

Have you just taken your GCSE or A level mocks and didn’t get anywhere near your predicted grades? Perhaps you’ve exams after the holidays, and are worried you are just not performing at your best just now?

Yes, that’s me. What now?

First off, you’re not alone. Thousands of students like you will be feeling the same crushing disappointment, the same ‘punch’ in the pit of your stomach.

It’s natural to feel gutted that your mock grades don’t match your potential at this moment in time… However disappointing, it’s important to not let yourself feel too overwhelmed.

Instead, as our very experienced tutors and teachers will tell you, now is the ideal opportunity to dust yourself down and look at the big picture… Here’s our top three suggestions on how to handle mock exam disasters:

  • Learn from your mistakes

We’ve all made them. Trick is to use your exam papers to identify where you went wrong and how you can resolve these weaknesses by the final exams. Are you weaker on specific papers than others? Is it a question of timing? Was it your exam prep which might have something to do with it?

  • Fight back with positive action 

Once you’ve pinpointed where you went wrong, use that information to put together your ‘fight back’ regime! Perhaps you need to try different revision techniques? Perhaps you need to practise more exam questions under timed conditions? 

  • Keep your chin up

An exam is only truly a ‘fail’ if you let it. Accept this happened, and move on with determination that these pesky exams are NOT going to get the better of you! Having a positive outlook will help you more than anything just now.

Focus your mind on your long-term goal. Once you’ve decided THAT is worth fighting for, it will make it easier for you in the coming term to leap beyond this annoying blip, and achieve the future success you deserve.

Tackle tricky topics with targeted tuition

Aside from reading more of our exam success tips, you can always get in touch to arrange some focused tuition with one of our experienced GCSE or A Level tutors.

With a pick of the best tutors across Manchester or Cheshire, dedicated 1-1 personal tuition can help you revise all those tricky topics that have held you back before.

Who says you have to be perfect?

Monday, May 16th, 2016

With the year 6 Sats last week, reports in the media revealed how stressed children were in the lead up to them.. And how tough the tests were.

Life, of course, is full of challenge. We can’t shield our children from that… After all, once they are in the job market, they’ll face stiff competition to get on in life. A dose of testing can help children prepare for the future..

However, a test or grade must never define a child’s worth… That’s why we were especially moved to read Willesborough Junior School’s letter sent to parents and pupils before the Sats exams.  Isn’t it great?

We catch them when they fall

What matters most is that children feel supported through these challenges. That there are safety nets when life at school gets tricky…

As a popular tuition service across Manchester and Cheshire, our lovely tutors often work with children whose confidence is in tatters, or are struggling with a subject.

We love nothing more than restoring a child’s confidence, and seeing big smiles when they’ve cracked a challenge that stumped them before.

Though we can’t stop Sats or 11+ tests, GCSEs or higher exams, we can make life easier for you. With the security and trust of a personal tutor, you can build on your subject weaknesses and turn them into strengths.

If we can help, just give our tuition team a call at head office.

Remember … no one is perfect. And even if you don’t do as well as you expect in future exams, never never give up.

 

 

How to boost your child’s self-esteem

Monday, April 25th, 2016

It can be heart-breaking for a parent to hear their child say ‘I’m rubbish’ or ‘I just can’t do it.’ Have you experienced this?

The primary school environment can be highly pressured where a child’s self-esteem can easily take a hit if he or she gets low marks in a test, if there’s a change of teacher, or even being moved down a set/class/table.

At secondary level, if a mock exam is given back without lots of positive feedback, it can massively affect a student’s confidence – even knock them off course at the final hurdle.

Endless supply teachers can also disrupt learning, where students don’t feel confident that they know enough.

How can you stem the tide?

1. Challenge negative self-talk with encouragement 

Remind your child how well they have done on something else in the subject previously, to help them balance out their perspective. Then offer to help: ‘Let’s work through this together…’

2. Reward effort, not just success

Children need to hear that they are ‘doing their best.’ If you only praise when they get something right, it can make them feel inadequate when they get something wrong.

3. Share your own failures 

Empathy is a powerful emotion.. When you share that you too used to find X subject tricky, or failed an exam but never gave up, it helps your child to see that getting it right first time doesn’t always happen.

Teaching children to not give up – to find different routes round a problem – can help them feel success is more reachable.

Get academic support from a personal tutor

Here at 1-21-1 Home Tutors in Wilmslow, we hear from worried parents all the time requesting exam and study support at stressful times in their child’s school career.

Luckily, we have a team of the loveliest tutors across Manchester and Cheshire who are there when your child needs that extra bit of help.

Contact us if you too need some advice. Remember, you’re not alone.

Have you got an exam tomorrow?

Monday, May 18th, 2015

Exams seem to strike fear into even the most confident student. It’s the moment you’ve been gearing up for since you first started school way back when. Finally, it’s here.

It’s natural to feel nervous. Everyone feels this. The trick is to try to relax as much as possible the night before rather than sit and dwell on the day ahead. More top tips next!

The day before:

  • Check you have the right equipment ready to take with you. Does your calculator work? Essential for Maths and Science. Do you have spare pens in case yours run out?
  • Read over your main notes without obesssing about them. Then go off and do something relaxing: read a book, watch a funny movie, have a kickabout with your mates outside
  • Eat a decent meal to power up your energy. This will help you sleep soundly too. Plus remember to set your alarm!

The day itself:

  • Eat a hearty breakfast. Don’t skip eating! Even a banana will give you energy.
  • Try to stay calm. Get comfortable at your table. Make sure your desk isn’t wobbly. Speak up if it isn’t otherwise it’ll annoy you. Take deep breaths too at your desk to calm yourself down.
  • Whether you’re taking GCSE exams this week or sitting your A Levels, remember that it’s just an exam. Most students do much better than they think they will. So go in there with your head held high, and give it all you’ve got!

May we wish all of our fabulous students across Manchester and Cheshire the best of luck. Go for it! In the meantime, if you need any last minute guidance or exam tuition, call the 1-2-1 Home Tutors team for a chat.

‘Tis the season … for revision

Monday, December 1st, 2014

Tra la la la la la la la la. As the term winds down and festivities gain pace, it can be hard for children to manage revision during this jolly season!

With mock exams often before or just after Christmas, and some entrance exams in January, how can children avoid exam panic and still enjoy the holidays?

Here are some holiday revision tips to give your child a head start:

  • Draw up a timetable. First make a list of different topics you need to cover – including topics you find challenging. Break the topics down into manageable chunks to help you spread revision out.
  • Do previous papers. Sitting a past paper (in the time allowance) helps you whittle down the areas you need to focus on. Focus on these areas rather than everything over the hols. This will help keep revision in perspective at this time of year.
  • Stick to a study regime. If you are away for the holidays, or family are visiting, there’ll be plenty of temptation to NOT study. Instead, stick to a system. Perhaps work mornings, then reward yourself afternoons off. Alternatively, if you have plenty of free time on your hands, mix up your revision with physical activities.
  • Learn on the move. Google revision apps. You’ll find a host of great iPad/iPhone, Android and iPod touch apps to download. A nice way to revise on the sofa, in the car or while waiting for family to finish their Christmas shopping.

Whatever you do, don’t panic. If overwhelm or brain freeze sets in, some revision sessions with a tutor can make all the difference. Drop 121 Home Tutors a line!

How to Beat Exam Stress

Monday, November 3rd, 2014

Does exam pressure worry you? An NUT survey revealed that children in Year 2 upwards are getting more exam stressed than ever before – with some avoiding school all together!

How can you help your child overcome exam nerves? Whether sitting SATs, Entrance tests, GCSEs or A Levels, why not try these practical tips:

  • Get planning! Map out what the exam papers cover, dividing revision into manageable chunks.
  • Take breaks. Don’t sit revising for hours on end. Instead, balance work with play/free time. Get some fresh air! Do something active. Go to the cinema…
  • Have fun. Short bursts of brain training can keep motivation up: play word games, have competitions with friends, do 10 minute activities, create flash cards to learn from.
  • Tackle past papers against the clock! A great activity as it fine-tunes your timing, and helps identify tricky questions.
  • Praise praise praise! The end result can seem a long way off. So keep your child’s spirits up by reassuring and praising them – often.

Remember: exam success often depends on a child’s confidence. Plus, knowing the right technique is half the battle! That’s how we can help…

So worry no longer. At 121 Home Tutors, specialist teachers can prepare your child for those dreaded tests, inspiring them to try their best. After all, that’s all that matters…

Exams imminent? With just two months to go before children sit independent school exams in Manchester, we can help. Call us today!

It’s never too early to get ahead

Tuesday, May 20th, 2014

With year 6 SATs out of the way, GCSEs and A Levels in full swing, many students this time of year often wish they’d revised more or got to grips with that tough part of the syllabus earlier.

Last minute revision can lead to panic. Feeling unprepared – and sometimes terrified – many children blank out in exams when faced with those dreaded questions.

And because exams are naturally competitive, a loss of confidence at the wrong time can sadly affect their eventual grades.

How can this cycle be avoided?

There’s no doubt: through steady revision and planning ahead students perform better. In fact, regular study helps them:

  • Overcome exam nerves, rather  than react to pressure the week before!
  • Structure their time better so that they don’t end up cramming
  • Boost their self-confidence and self-belief
  • Master difficult study areas so they feel ready to tackle any question
Passing exams often boils down to confidence. Whether you’re at primary or secondary school, in further education or an adult learner, you need to believe in yourself.

If this is something you struggle with, or lack of confidence affects your child, drop us a line at 121 Home Tutors. A tutor local to you – whether you’re in Altrincham, Wilmslow or Stockport (or anywhere across Manchester and Cheshire) can help you build skills over time so that you’re ready for anything!

How long should I spend revising?

Wednesday, April 17th, 2013

It’s only a few weeks until GCSE and A Level exams, with many starting in mid May and running until mid June. It’s when our students start to turn their minds to revision. The most frequent question we get from students is when they should start revising. They also want to know how and what they should revise. So we’ve come up with some top tips to help you through the next few weeks.

  • Most schools and colleges don’t finish teaching the syllabus (that’s everything you need to know to pass the exam) until close to exam dates. That can make revision tricky if you want to be very thorough. Sometimes there simply isn’t enough teaching time to cover all the topics in the syllabus. One way you can tackle this is to do some self-learning (or work with the support of a tutor) to get ahead and make sure you know every topic in the syllabus. You may be able to get a copy of the syllabus from school but you can usually get them from a specific exam board (always make sure you are learning the correct syllabus).
  • Self led learning can be tricky for younger students or those who are already struggling and this is where one to one tuition really comes in handy. A tutor can work through the syllabus efficiently to find gaps in knowledge and support your learning in school. You can also try working with a friend, asking for extra help in school or attending revision sessions.
  • One of the best ways to revise is to do lots of past papers. Don’t be put off if you find them hard. It’s a good way to test your knowledge and identify any gaps. It also gives you an idea of the kind of topics (and the types of questions) that are likely to come up in your exams.  It’s great to try and revise everything but without past question papers you might miss key points or how to apply what you have revised in an exam environment. It’s best to decide what’s ‘important’ to revise based on what is likely to be asked of you, rather than what you think it’s best to learn.
  • There is no right amount of time to revise for. Some lucky students appear to be able to quickly read notes they have made and pass an exam with a great grade. The reality is usually that they have been working slowly and steadily throughout the year. It’s best to spend half an hour a day (no more) planning your revision and then spend the rest of your time on a structured revision plan.

We have one to one tutors available across Manchester and Cheshire right now covering all GCSE and A Level topics and syllabuses. Call us today for more information.